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Glossary of Terms

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Term Definition
Count

Refers to the spinning capacity of wool ie. The number of hanks of yarn (worsted hank 512 metres long, woollen 256metres  which can be spun from 0.453kg (1 Lbs or Pound) of wool top when spun to its fullest capacity.

Count-out pen
Pen in which shearers releases the sheep after it has been shorn or crutched.
Crimp
The natural waviness of the wool fibre. Varies with the diameter of the fibre, the finer the wool the closer the crimp or wave formation.
Crimp Definition
The degree of alignment of the crimp waves within a staple.
Crimp Frequency
The number of crimp waves per centimetre of staple length. Coefficient of variation of crimp frequency refers to the variation in frequency between staples within a lot.
Crossbred
The result of crossing two different breeds of sheep. Generally applied to the progeny of two distinct sheep breeds, in Australia it is often that of a British breed and a Merino.
Crutch
The area on a sheep around the anus.
Crutching

Refers to the removal of wool from around the tail and between the rear legs of a sheep. It can also refer to removing wool from the heads of sheep (wigging) or the pizzle area of male sheep. This has a twofold purpose - minimisation of stain and as a control measure for possible flystrike.

Cull
An inferior sheep that is removed from the flock.
Curvature
The inverse of the radius of arc of a segment of a fibre snippet. Curvature is a measure of crimp expressed as degrees per millimetre.
Cut Out
The end of a particular mob of sheep within a flock or completion of shearing.
Cuticle
The outer layer of scales on the wool fibre.
Dag
Wool encrusted by faeces (dung).
Dark & Medulated Fibres
Pigmented fibres usually black or grey as well as any fibres affected by stain. Medullated fibres are coarse hollow fibres that cause serious problems in the dying process that are generally found on the hocks and briskets of sheep.
Dark and / or Medullated Fibre Risk (DMFR) Scheme
A voluntary vendor declaration for the risk of dark and / or medullated fibre contamination of Merino wool was introduced to Australia in July 2004, with the results reported in sale catalogues and test certificates. The risk scheme is based on the CSIRO concept of a stained and pigmented fibre risk factor for Merinos (DMFR), but extends it to include the dark and/or medullated fibre risk incurred when merino sheep come in contact with "exotic" sheep or their crosses. Exotic sheep are the breeds Awassi, Damara, Dorper and Karakul.
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